UK man being extradited due to unpaid debt in Qatar

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brit man in prison due to unpaid debt

A British man is reportedly facing extradition to Qatar over an unpaid debt owing. He is currently being held in middle eastern police cells in Iraq due to the unpaid bank debt in Qatar He is being held in Iraq and awaiting extradition to face charges relating to an unpaid debt owing to a bank.

Brian Glendinning aged 43 from Fife in Scotland was contracted to work on a Oil refinery in Iraq but was arrested on a Interpol ‘red notice’ at Bagdad Airport on September 12th.

His arrest has sparked fears for many Football fans travelling to the World Cup due to be held in Qatar next month.

Radha Stirling, founder of Ipex, an NGO seeking reform of Interpol and the extradition process, said Qatar National Bank sought the extradition of Mr Glendinning from Iraq over a small bank loan. But she said that with the World Cup starting in Qatar on November 20, the use of such red notices should be taken as a warning to football fans heading to the Gulf state.

The country is preparing to host 1.2 million visitors for the World Cup, including fans travelling to watch England and Wales.

Radha Stirling, an Interpol expert and founder of IPEX is reported by the Daily Record as commenting “The bank deliberately activates wrongful Interpol Notices as a debt collection tactic akin to extortion. They wait for a customer to be arrested and hope the parents will dispose of assets and pay the debt themselves.

Ms Stirling said Qatar had a history of wrongfully using Interpol notices “as a debt collection tactic akin to extortion”. She said: “They wait for a customer to be arrested and hope the parents will dispose of assets and pay the debt themselves,” she said.

“The bank usually asks for substantially more than what was owed, knowing parents will pay anything to keep their children out of jail.” She added: “We will make every diplomatic and legal effort to save Brian from extradition.

“We’ve helped Brits arrested in Spain [on an Interpol notice issued by Qatar], many times, the Czech Republic, Italy, Denmark, Ukraine and so on. “The police and court time is costly and the victim can be unfairly detained throughout the trial.”

Mr Glendinning’s family said he needed “urgent help” or risked extradition to Qatar, “where human rights violations are notorious and where it is likely he would never be allowed to leave”.

His brother, John Glendinning, 39, has set up a fundraiser to support Mr Glendinning’s wife Kimberly, son Bailey, daughters Heidi and Lexi and granddaughter Frankie.

His distressed brother John says: “Brian is a hardworking man who has always put his family first. He is the life and soul of any family occasion or party, where he earns the name happy feet (given to his dancing skills). Anyone who meets Brian ends up calling him friend, much loved and well liked in the village of Kincardine where he was brought up and still lives today”.

Stirling confirms: “We will make every diplomatic and legal effort to save Brian from extradition. We will further be making extradition treaty reform suggestions. Qatar is making itself a nuisance and costing taxpayers a lot of money. We’ve helped Brits arrested in Spain (many times), Czech, Italy, Denmark, Ukraine and so on.

“The police and court time is costly and the victim can be unfairly detained throughout the trial. It’s a human rights issue and clearly highlights Qatar’s intimate relationship with Interpol. With the World Cup coming up, Qatar should be mindful of rights attacks towards foreigners.

“I spoke with Brian’s mother Margaret. She was distraught and in tears. It really is a nightmare for family members. We are offering our full support to Brian’s family and legal team as an expert witness. I am confident we will bring Brian home”.

In just 19 hours, over £6,000 had been raised via an online fundraiser set up to support Brian and his family. To make a donation, you can do so here.

There have been similar siutations with British citizens owing monies in Dubai.

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